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hello world. my name is Ryan Alexander Boyles. often, it's pronounced the RAB. i'm into declarative living. i am a connector. this is my life-stream / tumblr / blog. call it what you will. find my sxsw posts. any questions, ask me anything! btw, here is a standard disclaimer.

 

8 Rules For Creating A Passionate Work Culture

1. Hire the right people

2. Communicate

3. Tend to the weeds

4. Work hard, play hard

5. Be ambitious

6. Celebrate differences 

7. Create the space 

8. Take the long view 

Operational Barriers to SocialBiz Success « State of Flow

Caroline Dangson shares characteristics of social business and top 10 operational barriers to social business in her latest blog post. This is my recommended reading for today’s IBM Career Development Day (a day once a month - with no meetings - to focus on personal growth and interaction with peer role models and mentors). Thanks Caroline.

I love lists, so I reblogged them here. Click through to watch the whole webinar captured by Christine Major and Mike Lewis.

Characteristics of Social Business

  1. People-centric (employees, customers, business partners)
  2. Transparent processes
  3. Culture of trust
  4. Egalitarian (everyone participates and has a voice)
  5. Self-organizing networks
  6. Two-way, unstructured information exchange
  7. Events are orchestrated, not controlled
Ten Operational Barriers to Social Business
  1. Organizational silos
  2. Command and control management
  3. Top-down, one-way communication channels
  4. Social activities not integrated into work flow
  5. Employees measured on individual performance
  6. Competitive culture
  7. No guidelines or training for social media
  8. No methods for measuring social value
  9. No executive sponsor for social initiatives
  10. No role models for social media initiatives (peers with experience and expertise)

Social Media Trends for 2010

To Be Successful, Companies Should Focus On Four Key Trends

1) Don’t fondle the hammer. Understand customers, focus on objectives, not develop strategies based on ever-changing tools. Companies really need to understand their customers first, see our recorded webinar to learn more.

2) Live the 80% rule. This is a movement: get your company ready. 80% of success is getting the right organizational model, roles, processes, stakeholders, and teams assembled –only 20% should be focused on technology.

3) Customers don’t care what department you’re in. Customers just want their problem fixed, they don’t care what department you’re in. Yet, now, nearly every department can have a direct relationship with your customers using social tools. As a result, provide customers with a holistic experience Start to investigate how brand monitoring, community tools and CRM systems are merging.

4) Real time is *not* fast enough. Companies cannot scale when it comes to social media, for most companies, you cannot hire enough people to monitor and respond to the conversation, As a result, lean on advocates, by building unpaid armies, and anticipate customer needs through advanced listening techniques.

Enterprise 2.0: Finding success on the frontiers of social business
by Dion Hinchcliffe

“Uptake moving faster than absorption
My recent exploration of the potential causes of Enterprise 2.0 failures here on ZDNet sparked a critical discussion in the blogosphere of enterprise social computing and its overall appropriateness, motivations, and benefits to business. In particular, well-known contrarian Dennis Howlett weighed in last week with fairly severe criticism of Enterprise 2.0 which ultimately resulted in a direct response from Andrew McAfee today (who described it originally). For those wanting to follow the rest of the conversation, Paula Thornton probably did the best round-up of the discussion. The range of responses shows a wide variety of opinion reflecting both the scope and timeliness of this subject. … Far from being a solution waiting for some kind of business problem, at present Enterprise 2.0 describes a new way of working together that is already being used by millions of workers every day.”

Enterprise 2.0: Finding success on the frontiers of social business

by Dion Hinchcliffe

Uptake moving faster than absorption

My recent exploration of the potential causes of Enterprise 2.0 failures here on ZDNet sparked a critical discussion in the blogosphere of enterprise social computing and its overall appropriateness, motivations, and benefits to business. In particular, well-known contrarian Dennis Howlett weighed in last week with fairly severe criticism of Enterprise 2.0 which ultimately resulted in a direct response from Andrew McAfee today (who described it originally). For those wanting to follow the rest of the conversation, Paula Thornton probably did the best round-up of the discussion. The range of responses shows a wide variety of opinion reflecting both the scope and timeliness of this subject. … Far from being a solution waiting for some kind of business problem, at present Enterprise 2.0 describes a new way of working together that is already being used by millions of workers every day.”

The fastest way to succeed is to double your failure rate.

Thomas J. Watson, Founder of IBM