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hello world. my name is Ryan Alexander Boyles. often, it's pronounced the RAB. i'm into declarative living. i am a connector. this is my life-stream / tumblr / blog. call it what you will. find my sxsw posts. any questions, ask me anything! btw, here is a standard disclaimer.

 

Men often hate each other because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they don’t know each other because they can not communicate; they can not communicate because they are separated.

MLK

Forbes Real-Time Billionaires

When you lose $1.75M on a single stock on any given day and the round off reports that effect as 0.00% change to your wealth…. yeah.

Imagine you have a total investment portfolio of $500k and you want to have $300k of that in stocks and $200k in bonds and cash.

"Imagine" How to Pay Taxes Like Mitt Romney

Forbes still not talking to the 99%?

I discovered these neat Migration Maps: The Real Social Networks via Tim O’Reilly on twitter today. Here is a map of the flock moving into Wake County NC in droves, a place I have called home for over a decade. Model your own local network data on this Forbes website. How popular is your county?

I discovered these neat Migration Maps: The Real Social Networks via Tim O’Reilly on twitter today. Here is a map of the flock moving into Wake County NC in droves, a place I have called home for over a decade. Model your own local network data on this Forbes website. How popular is your county?

G St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC 20002, United States (via waynesutton12)
New money? Federal Obama Note!

G St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC 20002, United States (via waynesutton12)

New money? Federal Obama Note!

The Center for Responsive Politics calculates that by Election Day $2.4 billion will have been spent on presidential campaigns in the two-year election cycle that began January 2007, and another $2.9 billion will have been spent on 435 House and 35 Senate contests. This $5.3 billion is a billion less than Americans will spend this year on potato chips.

Where the old Wall Street stuck to the most prestigious clients, the new Wall Street engaged in an unseemly rush to the bottom. Investment houses that once dealt only in grade-A bonds became swept up in junk bond mania in the 1980s. Firms that once snubbed companies beyond the Fortune 500 flocked to Silicon Valley in the 1990s, eager to take fly-by-night companies public. And, in the final reductio ad absurdum, Wall Street during the past decade gorged on mortgage-backed securities, tying its fate to America’s least creditworthy borrowers. Addicted to colossal amounts of leverage, the onetime arbiter of scarce capital had become the most profligate borrower. The large investment banks that once allocated precious capital now exist in a world awash with money, crisscrossed by capital flows from many continents, with financial markets deep and liquid as never before.