i'm fluent in javascript as well as klingon.

hello world. my name is Ryan Alexander Boyles. often, it's pronounced the RAB. i'm into declarative living. i am a connector. this is my life-stream / tumblr / blog. call it what you will. find my sxsw posts. any questions, ask me anything! btw, here is a standard disclaimer.

 

stoweboyd:

pewinternet:

A few things to explore ahead of today’s Apple announcements:

As of January 2014:

  •     90% of American adults have a cell phone
  •     58% of American adults have a smartphone
  •     32% of American adults own an e-reader
  •     42% of American adults own a tablet computer

Note that tablets have the fastest rise of any of these innovations (and ebook readers could be considered as a minimal subset of tablets, which would make the rise of tablets even more steep).

The network is vast and infinite.

newsweek:

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

newsweek:

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

"Imagine a world where the only media you consume serves to reinforce your particular set of steadfast political beliefs. Sounds like a pretty far-out dystopia, right? Well, in 1969, Internet pioneer Paul Baran predicted just that."
TV Will Tear Us Apart: The Future of Political Polarization in American Media
"Imagine a world where the only media you consume serves to reinforce your particular set of steadfast political beliefs. Sounds like a pretty far-out dystopia, right? Well, in 1969, Internet pioneer Paul Baran predicted just that."
TV Will Tear Us Apart: The Future of Political Polarization in American Media
This “Map of the internet 1.0” is great and the detail is incredible. Data FTW!
See the full version in all of it’s glory on Deviant Art. 
I would say however, because this map was inspired by xkcd’s awesome Online Communities 2.0 map from 2010 that it probably should be titled Map of the Internet 3.0.
(via Map of the Internet 1.0. by JaySimons on deviantART)

This “Map of the internet 1.0” is great and the detail is incredible. Data FTW!

See the full version in all of it’s glory on Deviant Art. 

I would say however, because this map was inspired by xkcd’s awesome Online Communities 2.0 map from 2010 that it probably should be titled Map of the Internet 3.0.

(via Map of the Internet 1.0. by JaySimons on deviantART)

The blog is dead, long live the blog » Nieman Journalism Lab » Jason Kottke

"The Stream might be on the wane but still it dominates. All media on the web and in mobile apps has blog DNA in it and will continue to for a long while.”

Sometime in the past few years, the blog died. In 2014, people will finally notice. Sure, blogs still exist, many of them are excellent, and they will go on existing and being excellent for many years to come. But the function of the blog, the nebulous informational task we all agreed the blog was fulfilling for the past decade, is increasingly being handled by a growing number of disparate media forms that are blog-like but also decidedly not blogs.

Instead of blogging, people are posting to Tumblr, tweeting, pinning things to their board, posting to Reddit, Snapchatting, updating Facebook statuses, Instagramming, and publishing on Medium. In 1997, wired teens created online diaries, and in 2004 the blog was king. Today, teens are about as likely to start a blog (over Instagramming or Snapchatting) as they are to buy a music CD. Blogs are for 40-somethings with kids.

Instead of launching blogs, companies are building mobile apps, Newsstand magazines on iOS, and things like The Verge. The Verge or Gawker or Talking Points Memo or BuzzFeed or The Huffington Post are no more blogs than The New York Times or Fox News, and they are increasingly not referring to themselves as such.

The primary mode for the distribution of links has moved from the loosely connected network of blogs to tightly integrated services like Facebook and Twitter. If you look at the incoming referrers to a site like BuzzFeed, you’ll see tons of traffic from Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Stumbleupon, and Pinterest but not a whole lot from blogs, even in the aggregate. For the past month at kottke.org, 14 percent of the traffic came from referrals compared to 30 percent from social, and I don’t even work that hard on optimizing for social media. Sites like BuzzFeed and Upworthy aren’t seeking traffic from blogs anymore. Even the publicists clogging my inbox with promotional material urge me to “share this on my social media channels” rather than post it to my blog.