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hello world. my name is Ryan Alexander Boyles. often, it's pronounced the RAB. i'm into declarative living. i am a connector. this is my life-stream / tumblr / blog. call it what you will. find my sxsw posts. any questions, ask me anything! btw, here is a standard disclaimer.

 

DataMasher: Get Freakonomic On Government Data

If you’re a lobbyist / advocate, conspiracy theorist or Freakonomics fan, then you’ll love DataMasher. The map-based mash up site just took the Sunlight Foundation’s $10,000 grand prize in the Apps for America 2: The Data.gov Challenge. DataMasher offers users with no programming experience a chance to compare government data sets on a state-by-state basis. The tool is just one of the 3rd party mash ups using Data.gov’s federal government information.

Gov 2.0: It’s All About The Platform

smarterplanet:

Editor’s note: The following guest post is by Tim O’Reilly, the founder and CEO of computer book publisher O’Reilly Media and a conference organizer. O’Reilly coined the term Web 2.0 five years ago. Now he is arguing it is time for Gov 2.0, and has helped organize a summit next week to talk about what that might mean.

…But as with Web 2.0, the real secret of success in Government 2.0 is thinking about government as a platform. If there’s one thing we learn from the technology industry, it’s that every big winner has been a platform company: someone whose success has enabled others, who’ve built on their work and multiplied its impact. Microsoft put “a PC on every desk and in every home,” the internet connected those PCs, Google enabled a generation of ad-supported startups, Apple turned the phone market upside down by letting developers loose to invent applications no phone company would ever have thought of. In each case, the platform provider raised the bar, and created opportunities for others to exploit. There are signs that government is starting to adopt this kind of platform thinking. Behind Federal CIO Vivek Kundra’s data.gov site is the idea that government agencies shouldn’t just provide web sites, they should provide web services. These services, in effect, become the government’s SDK (software development kit).

via Techcrunch

Like many aspects of applying Web 2.0 to the enterprise, the challenge is both in adapting the business and its thinking while successfully leveraging the latest delivery methods. (via The future of enterprise data in a radically open and Web-based world | Enterprise Web 2.0 | Dion Hinchcliffe)

Like many aspects of applying Web 2.0 to the enterprise, the challenge is both in adapting the business and its thinking while successfully leveraging the latest delivery methods. (via The future of enterprise data in a radically open and Web-based world | Enterprise Web 2.0 | Dion Hinchcliffe)

White House ditches YouTube after privacy complaints

Ironically, the decision by the White House comes days after YouTube began to roll out new policies to better protect the privacy of visitors who view videos embedded into federal government Web sites. The move by YouTube may prove to be too little, too late.

The White House’s decision to embed YouTube videos in the president’s official home page drew instant criticism from privacy activists. In addition to several critical posts on my blog, by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (here and here), the Center for Democracy and Technology and the Center for Digital Democracy blasted the choice of video providers.

The focus of the criticism was on the use of long-term tracking cookies by the Google-owned video-sharing site. When the new White House site first went live in January, every visitor to the president’s blog would be issued a tracking cookie, even those who did not click the “play” button to watch the video.

The White House - Blog Post - Change has come to WhiteHouse.gov

Is Macon Phillips (photo) gov2.0’s CBO (Chief Blogging Officer)?

I’m Macon Phillips, the Director of New Media for the White House and one of the people who will be contributing to the blog.:

Millions of Americans have powered President Obama’s journey to the White House, many taking advantage of the internet to play a role in shaping our country’s future. WhiteHouse.gov is just the beginning of the new administration’s efforts to expand and deepen this online engagement.

Just like your new government, WhiteHouse.gov and the rest of the Administration’s online programs will put citizens first. Our initial new media efforts will center around three priorities:

  1. Communication
  2. Transparency
  3. Participation